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Hidden Treasure Trail

Of Fife’s more than 40 golf courses many are internationally renowned – the Old Course at St Andrews being the most famous of all – but among the Kingdom’s unique collection there are many that deserve a much higher profile.

These are Fife’s hidden treasures often overlooked in the rush to the iconic names. But to rush past is to seriously lose out on some wonderful golfing experience.

The Thornton Golf Club near Kirkcaldy is a classic example. This fine parkland layout that wanders through avenues of trees is nothing short of delightful and the club takes a special pride in its warm welcome to visitors.

To the west of Kirkcaldy overlooking the Firth of Forth the Kinghorn Golf Club enjoys a well-deserved reputation for the quality of it challenge. It is one of Scotland’s oldest golf courses dating back to 1887 when Old Tom Morris laid out the original nine holes. Today the 18-hole layout is greatly admired and sought out by many return visitors who have experienced the test and enjoyed the spectacular views it offers.

Near neighbour, the Aberdour Golf Club, is proud of its reputation for “golf with a view”. It enjoys spectacular panoramas across the Firth of Forth to the Lothians beyond as well as a challenge that is stiff enough for most. Despite its proximity to the sea this is very much a parkland layout.

Final stop on the Hidden Treasure Trail is the Burntisland Golf Club. This venerable club lays claim to be the 10th oldest golf club in existence with 1797 as the date accepted for its inception. The layout on the Dodhead Links over which the club plays was originally the work of Willie Park Jnr of Musselburgh, twice an Open Champion. The hand of James Braid can also been seen here on the coastal fringe above the Firth of Forth.

4 Courses
4 Days